Grand River Fishing Report

Condition Of The Grand River

The Grand River, in downtown Grand Rapids, is starting to see the beginning of the fall steelhead run and is in great shape. Right now the river is flowing at 5,000 cfs with a water temp in the upper 40’s to low 50’s depending on the day. With the recent rain and cold coming, this will only drive more steelhead into the system.

Steelhead Update:

The steelhead that are coming in are dime bright and fresh from Lake Michigan. The majority of the fish are moving up the river and on into the tributaries. They are not holding as of yet. With that said, we are fishing the choke points and tradition zones to get on them versus the deeper winter holes.

These early steelhead pack a punch and as we’ve said before, they can move at speeds of up to 26 feet per second. As a result of this, we are using 12 lbs mono main line to 12 lbs leader. Anything less and you’ll lose them. Anything more and they’ll shy away as a result of seeing the leader. We been using 10 mm and 8 mm beads with number #4 wide gap hooks. Try using Mottledbeads in Glow Roe and Peach Roe. The water is somewhat stained so If you’re going to run two beads, add a Chartreuse to get their attention.

If you want to hook into these silver bullets under the skyscrapers of downtown Grand Rapids the rest of October, November and into the first part of December are a great time to fish. So give us call today.

Captain Tom Werkman

Grand River Fishing Report

Here is our fishing report for September 7, 2019 for smallmouth bass, northern pike and salmon for the Grand River, near Grand Rapids, Michigan. We report around the first of each month on the what’s happening on the river. There is definitely a different feel in the air these days. The days are getting shorter and the nights cooler. With that said, mid month will see above average temps with above average precipitation. All good for the salmon as they start to make their way from Lake Michigan into of the Grand River and the Muskegon River.

The gage in Ada is now continues to hover around 7.25 feet, low, with the water temp in the mid 60’s. The Grand continues to be in great shape with fantastic clarity.

Smallmouth Bass Fishing Report

Despite the the cooler night temps lately, the smallmouth on the Grand River are still their summer patterns. The majority of the the bass we’ve been getting into have been found in the riffle sections of the river or holding tight to timber. The best lures continue to be spinners baits. We’ve been using Mepps size 4 with bucktails in back and red with a copper blade. If you fish the riffle sections remember the bass can be anywhere, so cast everywhere. Look to the seams and breaks behind the rocks for your best success. If you fish timber, use creature baits, rigged weedless and drop the creature smack into the wood and work the whole structure. It may take a some tries to elicit a strike, so be patient. The best color and size for creatures are the 4 inch “Bama Craw” rigged to a 3/O hook and a 1/4 bullet weight.

Northern Pike Fishing Report

As far as northern pike on the Grand River is going, it has been tough. We usually get one per trip. The water temps are up so if you hook one, don’t play it, get it to the boat quickly, keep it in the water, take your hero shot and release it. This will help reduce mortality.

Fall Salmon Update:

Coho are stating to make their way through the fish ladder at Sixth Street in Grand Rapids. We have seen a few in the Ada section but not in any numbers yet.

In about another month we see the kings in the upper section of Muskegon River near Newaygo. Although we aren’t targeting them right now, fishing reports indicate, they are slowly starting to stage in the lower Muskegon. They are big and feisty this fall, with many being caught in the 30 pound + range. If you want to hear your drag scream and feel your rod about to break then give us a call. October is primetime for these freight trains. Here are some pictures from last year in October….but you get the idea.

Fall is really the best time to fish in West Michigan. Warm days, cool nights and a variety of species are in the river at once for the angler to pursue. We still have open dates, so drop us a line and get in on all the action.

Captain Tom Werkman

Fishing High and Dirty Water June 2019

Fishing dirty water can be a challenge. Use these techniques and you’ll find success. I’m not going to lie. So far, this spring on the Grand we have seen below normal temps with above normal precipitation. The Grand River watershed is the second largest in the state of Michigan and when it rains that means higher flows and dirty water. Don’t fear it but rather embrace it for the challenge. Just because the river is high and dirty doesn’t mean the fish stop eating. The smallmouth bass and northern pike that call the Grand home are use to living in these river conditions.

High and dirty water means targeting the feeder creeks and fishing tight to the bank and structure. We have been using size 10 X-Rap’s in white, orange and perch color. When retrieving, jerk them slowly while keeping slack in your line. Once the you have jerked the X-Rap 2, 3, or 4 times reel the slack and repeat. This way the smallmouth bass and northern pike can hear the rattle, have time to hone in on it and right before they strike, see it.

Once you pick up a smallmouth on the search bait, switch to dredging with a 1/2 oz bullet weight and 3/O hook with a creature bait. We have been having success on black. The bigger the creature and the slower the bounce along the bottom the easier it is for them to see it. With a 1/2 oz bullet weight bouncing off the bottom that will create enough noise for the fish to hear it coming in these high and dirty water conditions. Remember to cast up river at a 45 degree angle and then let it bounce off the bottom down until the line is parallel with the current. Reel it in and repeat. Be patient and pick the area apart using a grid as a template.

Don’t let high and dirty water keep you off the river. Embrace your fear of it and you’ll be rewarded.

Captain Tom Werkman

Grand River Fishing report for May 2019

X Rap’s:

X Raps are the name of the game in the Spring Lake bayous right now.  This time of yearmthese lures have the best chance to elicit a strike from a largemouth bass or northern pike.  Here is our fishing report for May 2019.

Grand River:

With the high water in the Grand River right now, we have switched to fishing the shelter of the Spring Lake Bayous.  The gauge in Ada peaked at 14.5 feet on May 5 and has been slowly coming done.  As of today, May 8, it’s at 12.9 feet.  The river should be in decent shape this coming weekend, assuming no more rain.  Remember, the Grand River is the second largest drainage system in Michigan next to the Saginaw Valley and it takes time for all that water to move through the system.

Northern Pike:

Water temps in the Spring Lake bayous have been ranging from 53 degrees to 57 degrees depending in the time of day.  Water clarity is nicely stained and the weeds have yet to hit the surface.  The water temp is near ideal for the northern pike.  They are coming off the spawn and some look pretty beat up, so if you land one handle them with care.

We have primarily been using X Raps in size 10 on a medium heave rod with fast action tips with 20 lbs mono to create the best movement for lures.  When retrieving, remember to jerk the bait as much as you can in an irradict way.  The key is to keep some slack in your line as you jerk and reel.  The more irradict the retrieve, the better the lure will elicit a strike. Use colors that are more natural with added orange in them such a Perch or Tennessee Olive Shad.  This time of year the northerns will be in the weeds, between 3 to 10 feet deep.  If you find weeds in this range, work the line.

Northern Pike caught on an X Rap in a Spring Lake Bayou
Spring Lake Bayou Northern Pike

Largemouth Bass:

The bass are in their pre-spawn mode and are in the 6 to 10 feet range.  Normally this time of year you can count on starting to see some bass on beds.  However, with the colder than normal temps this has pushed the spawn back.  Once we start to get water temps consistently in the mid 60’s, bass will start showing up in the shallower areas.

The majority of the action we have been being with largemouth bass has come, again, on X Raps in size 10.  When fishing for the Green Trout, use the same techniques as you would for northern pike.  Use colors that are more natural with added orange in them such a Perch, or Tennessee Olive Shad as well.

Targeting bass with finesse fishing should improve as water temps rise, but right now it’s not producing the results we are looking for.

Largemouth Bass caught on a X-Rap
Grand River Bayou Largemouth Bass

The northern pike action has been good and the bass action will only get better as the water temps rise.  If you want catch these bayou bruisers then give us a call.  They easily cork over an 8 wt or medium heavy rod and give the angler a nice fight.

Steelhead Fishing Report for the Grand River 12/18

This is the Grand River fishing report as of December 2018.  Colder than normal temperatures were the story for the first half of December.  As a result this has put the steelhead into their winter mode on the Grand River.  The steelhead numbers are somewhat down from previous years but the fish seem bigger.  

The water temperature has been cold, mid 30’s and somewhat stained.  Slow things down to get the best response to your presentation.  Remember, look for the slow water and the deeper runs and holes.  You’ll need to float your drift numerous times through, as the fish are sluggish right now.  

Set Up:

Currently, the only method we’ve been using right now is float.  Our main line has been 12 lbs mono dropping to an 8 lbs leader and in some instances 6 lbs.  The reel has been a Daiwa 4000 series with a 10’ 6” Okuma SST rod.  

Try using beads in various orange colors along with chartreuse and mix it up between the 12 mills and the 10 mills.  Remember, if your using 12 mills you should use a #4 hook.  Use a Raven 11 gram bobber.  If the steelhead feel any resistance when they grab, they’ll let it go.  

However, if the runs are short try the chuck and duck method.  This will get your rig down quicker to where the fish are than a float rig normally would. 

If you’re going to use flies, use larger egg patters with some color along with larger stoneflies.   

Weather Shift:

A warmer than normal weather pattern is setting up for the rest of the month, along with some rain this week.  As a results, the water temp will warm up a bit and this should send some fresh fish up.  With that said, keep using the same techniques.  

Don’t be afraid of the cold, this is a great time of year to fish.  Low pressure and if you put in your time you’ll be rewarded with big fish.  

Getting Ready for Fall Fishing

Fall is one of the best times of the year to fish the Grand River in Grand Rapids, Michigan for salmon and steelhead. The hot days and warm nights turn to warm days and cool nights.  The green leaves turn to oranges, reds and yellows and the salmon start their annual pilgrimage into the Muskegon, Grand and White rivers as well as and other tributaries.  Smallmouth bass and northern pike become even more aggressive as they fatten up for the long winter.

With the salmon pilgrimage the fall steelhead follow as they find a food source, salmon eggs, in the rivers along with other aquatic insects and smolt.  They stay in the systems until they migrate back out into Lake Michigan in the spring after they spawn.  Trout are on the prowl as well, fattening up for winter on the abundant biomass in the area river systems.

During this time, at least on the Grand River, it’s important to use multiple techniques to maximize your success.  There are various techniques that can be used but here are some that we prefer.

Fly Fishing:

Chuck-n-Duck:

  • Chuck-n-Duck:  The Chuck-n-Duck method can be used for salmon, trout and steelhead.  With salmon, once they enter the upper river systems and start to spawn, they no longer feed.  As a result, they will no longer eat your presentation.  At this point, the goal of this technique is to “line” the fish in the mouth as the flies drift into their path to hook and then land them.  With steelhead and trout this method can be effective in the deeper holes and pools.  If you see fish spawning, please remember to not target the females on their redds and to fish the pocket water.   The pocket water typically will hold trout, and male salmon and steelhead.  If you remove the female off her redd she will be exhausted and stressed from the fight and may no longer have the energy to spawn, thus effecting future populations

Streamers:

  • Streamers:  Streamer fishing involves using either floating or sink-tip lines tied to leaders with descending strength to a fly that looks like a smolt, minnow, or another form of baitfish.  With this method the fly is “stripped” through the water and as it is stripped imitates a moving baitfish.  Typically the predator fish will instinctively react to the movement and strike the streamer in an aggressive bite.

Indicator / Bobber:

  • Indicator / Bobber: This technique involves using floating line tied to leaders with descending strength to tippet.  In order to get your fly/flies down, various size split shot is used.  The bobber is positioned on the leader so it can be adjusted to the changing river depth. If the bobber goes down you have a bite.  The bobber don’t lie.  This form of fishing is much more subtle than streamer fishing and is used when the water temperature is much colder and the fish are lethargic.

Center Pin:

  • Centerpin fishing, also called float fishing, is a fishing technique which uses a centerpin rod, a centerpin reel, and spawn, skein, an artificial fly or bead coming off of a leader of various descending strengths to tippet.   Centerpins are designed to freespool line off the reel and allow for a natural downstream drift of your float presentation without any interruption.  In order get the line down, various size split shot are used to keep the line vertical in the water column for a natural presentation of the fly, bead or bait.

Crankbaits & Plugs:

  • Plugs are a popular type of hard-bodied fishing lure. They are widely known by a number of other names that include crankbait, wobbler, thundersticks, minnow, shallow-diver and deep-diver. The term minnow is usually used for long, slender, lures that imitate baitfish, while the term plug is usually used for shorter, deeper-bodied lures which imitate deeper-bodied fish. Shallow-diver and deep-diver refer to the diving capabilities of the lure, which depends on the size and angle of the lip, and lure buoyancy.  These lures are used when an anchored boat is positioned upstream and the lures are dropped off the back of the boat about 60 to 120 ft depending on the depth of the hole.  The current will take the lure back and once the the line set, will “dive”/ wobble to trigger a strike.
  • Crankbaits are another deadly technique for catching fish.  This technique involves casting toward the bank and positioning your rod downstream and slowly retrieving the lure.  During the first stages of the salmon run in the lower sections of rivers this can elicit and violent strike.

What ever method or technique you use, make sure to get out on the river and enjoy this time.  It only comes once a year and life is way to short to not enjoy it and catch fish. Tight lines all.