Grand River Fishing report for May 2019

X Rap’s:

X Raps are the name of the game in the Spring Lake bayous right now.  This time of yearmthese lures have the best chance to elicit a strike from a largemouth bass or northern pike.  Here is our fishing report for May 2019.

Grand River:

With the high water in the Grand River right now, we have switched to fishing the shelter of the Spring Lake Bayous.  The gauge in Ada peaked at 14.5 feet on May 5 and has been slowly coming done.  As of today, May 8, it’s at 12.9 feet.  The river should be in decent shape this coming weekend, assuming no more rain.  Remember, the Grand River is the second largest drainage system in Michigan next to the Saginaw Valley and it takes time for all that water to move through the system.

Northern Pike:

Water temps in the Spring Lake bayous have been ranging from 53 degrees to 57 degrees depending in the time of day.  Water clarity is nicely stained and the weeds have yet to hit the surface.  The water temp is near ideal for the northern pike.  They are coming off the spawn and some look pretty beat up, so if you land one handle them with care.

We have primarily been using X Raps in size 10 on a medium heave rod with fast action tips with 20 lbs mono to create the best movement for lures.  When retrieving, remember to jerk the bait as much as you can in an irradict way.  The key is to keep some slack in your line as you jerk and reel.  The more irradict the retrieve, the better the lure will elicit a strike. Use colors that are more natural with added orange in them such a Perch or Tennessee Olive Shad.  This time of year the northerns will be in the weeds, between 3 to 10 feet deep.  If you find weeds in this range, work the line.

Northern Pike caught on an X Rap in a Spring Lake Bayou
Spring Lake Bayou Northern Pike

Largemouth Bass:

The bass are in their pre-spawn mode and are in the 6 to 10 feet range.  Normally this time of year you can count on starting to see some bass on beds.  However, with the colder than normal temps this has pushed the spawn back.  Once we start to get water temps consistently in the mid 60’s, bass will start showing up in the shallower areas.

The majority of the action we have been being with largemouth bass has come, again, on X Raps in size 10.  When fishing for the Green Trout, use the same techniques as you would for northern pike.  Use colors that are more natural with added orange in them such a Perch, or Tennessee Olive Shad as well.

Targeting bass with finesse fishing should improve as water temps rise, but right now it’s not producing the results we are looking for.

Largemouth Bass caught on a X-Rap
Grand River Bayou Largemouth Bass

The northern pike action has been good and the bass action will only get better as the water temps rise.  If you want catch these bayou bruisers then give us a call.  They easily cork over an 8 wt or medium heavy rod and give the angler a nice fight.

Spring Smallmouth and Grand River Dredging Update

The good news is spring is here on the Grand River and so are the smallmouth.  The bad news is, so is a proposal to the dredge the Grand River. which has nothing to do with the Grand River Restoration project.   I’ll get to the dredging in a minute.  The Grand right now is high, dirty and moving fast.  The crowds at the dam in Grand Rapids are gone and we have the river back to ourselves.  It’s finally nice to enjoy the quiet solitude of this river.  There are still some steelhead in the system but for the most part they are far and few in-between.  We have been seeing steelhead roll back over the dam, moving as fast as they can out to the big lake.

We have been transitioning over to smallmouth and northern pike and it feels good to be back in the warmwater game.  Water temps are running between 48 and 50 degrees depending on the day and the fish are hungry.  The river is high and dirty.  However, with that said there is about a foot and half of clarity, not to bad for the Grand.

Grand River Small
Grand River Smallie

When targeting smallmouth your allies, in these conditions, are going to be lures that create vibration and noise.  Success for us has been the 3/8 oz. double bladed willow leaf spinnerbait in both black and white.  Use leaders with 15 lb fluorocarbon tied to 30 lbs hi-viz Power Pro braid.  In these conditions, the best places to fish are going to be the feeder creeks and right up against the bank.  Fortune favors the bold and you’ll need to cast as far up those feed creeks as you can.  Don’t be afraid to lose a some hardware along the way.

Pre-Spawn Smallmouth
Pre-Spawn Smallmouth

Grand River Dredging Update:

For those you that don’t know, there is a developer, Dan Hibma, that would like to dredge the Grand River from Fulton Street in Grand Rapids to the Bass River Outlet in Eastmanville.  That’s 23 miles.  He feels that there are powerboaters that would like to take their boats from Lake Michigan all the way up to Grand Rapids.  In addition, he wants to put a marina right by Johnson Park in Grandville.  I wonder how they would get to the marina after last years flooding event when the Grand peaked at 42,000 cfs.

In the 12th hour, during the republican lame duck session last year, then Senator Arlen Meekhof slipped into legislation over $3.0 million for dredging.  He thought that no-one would see it.  There has been no public meetings on it, no citizen involvement and no input.  Seems all shady to me.  Oh and did I mention that the developer owns 200 acres of land on the Grand River. Oh, he has also offered up his property as a site to put the dredge spoils, so he can develop it.

Thankfully, there is a group called Friends of the Lower Grand River that has organized to stop this.  Through their efforts, and the turnout of Ottawa County citizens, it appears that the Ottawa County Commissioner’s will vote to oppose the dredge.  In addition, a number of local municipalities have also passed resolutions opposing it.  However, like all things that are environmentally destructive, projects like this are like zombies, they never die.  The only way this gets stopped is through the legislature.  Mr. Meekhof, when he added the appropriation rider did it in a way that if the money is not used in a given year it rolls over into the next and so.  Again, shady.

I don’t have to say, if the dredging goes through one of Michigan’s best steelhead runs will be destroyed.  If the Grand River is dredged, 50 feet wide by 7 feet deep for 23 miles, all the riffles, runs, holes and pocket water gets ripped out.  When you channelize a river it destroys habitat, biodiversity and water quality.  If you feel compelled please follow the Friends group on Facebook.  There you can get all the latest news and updates on this proposal.

Captain Tom Werkman

Ode To The Anti-Hero Shot

On a recent guide trip I thought about, “what makes a hero shot”. Which lead me to, “what makes an anti-hero shot”. Which further lead me to, is possible you can have an “anti-hero shot” and yet still have the “hero shot?” The answer is a resounding yes.

However, let me explain it better. In order for me to write an ode to the “anti-hero shot”, I have to first define what the “hero shot” is. A hero shot, for those that don’t know, is a picture of someone holding big fish. That fish, for example, could be a steelhead, salmon, northern pike, bass, etc. The hero shot usually gets posted on the different social media channels for various reasons, not the least of which is to get “likes.” That’s all fine and I need to come clean. I am guilty of posting the hero shot and have done it on many occasions.

This past week I did a guide trip on the Kalamazoo River for steelhead. I went there because I wanted to avoid the crowds, which we succeeded in doing. We fished the lower section, where I had been successful many times in the past.

The guide trip was, quite frankly, tough. We used all the tricks, from spawn and beads to back plugging and trolling. We worked hard for seven hours, covering all the usual runs, holes, pockets, seams, timber, etc. No bobber went down, no poles bent and no fish to net.

Finally, after about the seventh hour and near the end of the trip, the bobber went down in a riffle section of the river. Fish on! A dime bright steelhead was on the line, fresh from Lake Michigan. As a result, it jumped, tailed on the water and did a little run. A fight ensued, the fish was netted, unhooked and held up for the “hero shot.”

Man holding a skippy steelhead from the Kalamazoo River
Skippy steelhead

Certainly you can tell, from the picture, the steelhead was lucky to tip 3 pounds on the scale. Call it what you want, a skippy, dink, jack, whatever, and laugh, but we worked hard for that fish.

After that, the trip ended and we ran down river to boat launch and chatted some more about the day. The clients thanked me for the trip, got in their truck and head back home. We didn’t find any large steelhead that day, as a guide, I was frustrated. I couldn’t give them the hero shot they might have been looking for and it wasn’t for lack of trying. They worked hard and so did I.

The Real Hero:

To sum all this up, I came to the realization the hero of the day, or any day for that matter while on the river, is the client not the size of the fish. That is to say, when the client works hard all day, they don’t give in to frustration, they don’t complain and they keep going during the toughest of conditions, they are the real heroes. To me that defines the “small fish” anti-hero shot with a hero in it.

Ode To The Anti-Hero Shot:

My little skippy, the anti-hero people think you are
As an angler I have longed for you
My heart has ached through the trials and tribulations 
of the day
fighting snags, wind, snow and rain
You come fresh from the big lake all dime bright
ready for that mighty big fight
my bobber goes down and I set the hook
You jump with scorn as I reel you in
net in hand and land you 
You many not be the beast I was hoping for 
but you’re a steelhead none the least
I hold you in my hands for the picture
before letting you go
don’t be embarrassed of your size
for what people didn’t see was I persevered

and for me that was the real prize

Captain Tom Werkman

The Spring Steelhead Run Update

With the recent warm temperatures in West Michigan spring is on everyone’s mind. With that, steelhead fishing is back. After a long winter of deep snow and polar vortexes the cabin fever can be broke by hitting the rivers. Here’s our fishing report.

After the recent flooding event in West Michigan, over the past few days we’ve been able to get out on area river to do some fishing.

Grand River

Depending on the day, fishing has been good, but a lot of these fish are still dark, hold overs from winter. We have seen a few chrome ones mixed in, which is a sign that our spring push of fish is just about to arrive.

As the water slowly starts to drop and water temps start to rise into the lower 40’s, the fishing will be getting better and better.

Lately, we have been targeting both spring spots such as buckets and pockets behind good gravel. In addition, we are also targeting the deeper runs and winter holes. We have been finding fish in both areas but most are they are still in deeper runs.

With the first fish of our spring run showing up a lot of these fish have spawning on their minds. That means on thing, eggs. Try using 8mm and 10mm beads as well as egg flies. Colors such as glow roe, peachy king, and peach roe have been bringing fish to the boat.

High Water Tactics For Michigan Steelhead

In the higher flows like we are currently seeing, we like running a bit larger floats. 11-15 gram floats with a shot pattered to match the float accordingly. This will slow your drift down a bit more to give the steelhead a chance to see your presentation.

If you haven’t check out our short film on “Gifts of the Grand” here it is. We partnered with Experience Grand Rapids and Aaron Peterson Studio to showcase the environmental comeback and fishing opportunities that exist on the Grand. The film was shown at the Mountain Film Festival in Saugatuck this past weekend.

Remember to use caution while wading in fast water and while on gravel. Leave spawning fish alone to do their thing so they can make more wild steelhead for all of us.

Captain Max Werkman

The Best Part of Fishing Isn’t the Pictures But the Stories

Fighting A Steelhead

For me the best part of fishing is when you hook a fish and lose it. Probably all of you reading this think, “that’s a stupid thing to say.” I have been fishing for the better part of 40 years and here’s why, for me, I believe that to be true.

It’s All Very Public

Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy catching fish as much the next person. There is nothing like bringing a fish to the net, holding it for the quick hero shot, releasing it, then posting the pictures to social media. If it’s big enough, you’ll get all kinds of likes and comments and feel like a rockstar. Over time, you’ll show the pictures on your social media pages to friends. They’ll all be like “Wow, that’s big fish”. It’s all very public and people respond instantly to pictures.

Until It’s Not Public

Last spring I was fishing on a mid-Michigan river during the steelhead run. It had been a tough day with one fish brought to net and a few pictures taken.

We drifted downstream to about one river mile from the takeout when we came across a log jam pushed up against a high bank where we stopped. The person I was fishing with asked “have you fished this before.” My reply was “No, but it just looks fishy.” “No it doesn’t” he said and proceeded to walk a little further back up river to fish.

I took my rod, walked down to just above the log jam and cast my bobber into the seam that would run it next to the log jam. I waited. The bobber started it’s drift right next to the first log, went past it to the second log, and was about to enter the take out zone when it went down……

I lifted the rod and set the hook knowing that the steelhead would run, with all it was, right into the logs. For about five hot seconds it was on…..and then off. I quickly re-rigged. Cast and sent the bobber down the same seam, with the outcome being the same as the first drift. This repeated itself about seven drifts with various lengths of times the fish was on. I sent a few more dirts down the seam and nothing, so we got back in the drift boat and head to the takeout.

As we drove home, the adrenaline left my system and now I felt just plain defeated. Those fish I had hooked where a hot mess, dime bright and of decent size. I had no pictures to post and no hero shots. I would get no likes or comments. One my way back home I decided the call that hole the “Shit Hole” for how I felt.

It’s All About The Story

To this day I couldn’t tell you about that fish we landed that day. It’s just another picture on my Facebook and Instagram page. Over time that picture just gets lost in an endless river of hero shots.

For me, I tend to not have as much of a connect to pictures as I do to stories. Pictures make me see but stories make me feel and it’s this feeling that connects me to a place and time. Stories help me to remember. It seems the stories I remember the most are about the ones that got away.

I won’t forget that day at my named “Shit Hole.” I can still tell that story over and over again just like it happened. Ever time we go by it on the river the story gets told to clients, fishing buddies and even to myself when I’m alone. Yes, I lost a lot of steelhead that day but I also gain the ability to tell a story that I’ll remember for a very long time. Isn’t that what fishing is suppose to the about. Not the pictures but the stories we can tell.

Captain Tom Werkman


Ice Fishing Report for Hamlin Lake

The Polar Vortex

Well like I’ve been saying and posting for the past month, the Polar Vortex has arrived in west Michigan. It’s about time. The area lakes are nicely freezing up. However, to be safe check with your local tackle shop to make sure. Here’s our fishing report.

Hamlin Lake Fishing Report:

We’ve been fishing on Hamlin Lake up near Ludington, Michigan and have been doing very well. Ice is a solid 7+ inches.

If you’re going to head up to Hamlin Lake, then you’ll want to hit the 10 to 15 foot range out from the boat launch off of Bugg Point.

Use crappie or perch minnows dead sticking. We have been using 2 lbs to 6 lbs mono with a Swedish Pimple, silver, to get fish on the ice. Make sure that you connect the pimple or jig to a snap swivel to prevent the line from getting all crazy as a result of the minnow swimming around. If you don’t, that will definitely effect your presentation.

Northern Pike:

If you want to target northern pike on tip-ups use shiners. But watch out, the pike have been theives. We’ve had many a flag only to see our shiners stolen. Try using smaller treble hooks placed horizontally along the shiners lateral line and remember to puncture the swim bladder. This will help create better bait movement and keep your bait at the desired depth.

With that said, we’ve been finding the best way to catch pike right now is using a jig tipped with a shiner or blue minnow deadsticking. We’ve been having alot of action and success with this method. Be ready, as they smack with a vengeance and let me tell you there is nothing like bringing in a pike on a 24 inch medium action ice rod on 6 lbs test. The fight is incredible.

Trip to Hamlin Lake

Crappie:

The crappie bite has been coming at dusk. If you’re going to target slabs use either a bobber rig or a jig. Just make sure to tip it with a crappie minnow.

The best part of fishing in Ludington is after you get off the ice head into town to Ludington Bay Brewing for a round of beer and great food.

Mid- Range Forcast

The rest of January will continue with sub-freezing temps and the climate models right now are calling for a colder than normal February. I believe that will be the case. Good news for ice fishing. Stay tune for more ice fishing reports.

Fish Grand Haven

The port of Grand Haven is often known for it’s Lake Michigan charter fishing. These charter boats chase after salmon, steelhead and lake trout from spring through early fall and offer the angler the opportunity to catch the fish of a lifetime. However, this port also provides the angler with a different kind of opportunity. One that lies up river in the bayous and deltas of the Grand River.

The Bayous & Deltas

The Grand River reaches Lake Michigan at Grand Haven. However, just before that the river forms its bayous and deltas which offer the angler some of the best productive waters for northern pike, walleye, bass and the occasional muskie. Here is where much of the fish production happens. As the nutrients flow down the Grand they end up in the lower sections of the river. These nutrients feed plankton and zooplankton which further feed bait fish, which inturn feed the larger predator fish.

Northern Pike and Bass

Spring is the time of year we fish the bayous and deltas for northern pike, walleye and bass. As the water temps begin to rise from ice-out, these fish start to become more active in search of food. They begin moving more into the shallows, patrolling weed and break lines to find and ambush the forage fish.

During the spring the bass enter spawn mode. This is one of the best times to catch the “green trout” as they will aggressively defend their redd from anything that comes near it. The bite this time of year can be fantastic with many sight fishing opportunities. It’s important to remember that once they are hooked to quickly land and release them so they can go back to defend their redd from other predators looking for a quick meal off their eggs.

Walleye

Because of the stained nature, deep holes and access to Lake Michigan the Grand has a fantastic walleye fishery. Many of these holes can be found between Indian Channel and near the gravel pits up by the Bass River Recreation Area. When targeting marble eyes there will be a lot of incidental catches as the Grand is a very diversified fishery. So just be prepared. Typical techniques include jigging and trolling for them using a variety of lures and rigs.

If you come to Grand Haven consider an alternative to a Lake Michigan fishing charter and try fishing for the Michigan natives that the Grand, its bayous and deltas call home.

Yes, It’s an Ice Fishing Report!

In west Michigan it sure looks like you shouldn’t have put your boat away in winter storage. The warmer than average temps have made the lakes essentially ice free and those that have it, you shouldn’t attempt to go on. Which leads to the question, where in Michigan do you go ice fishing these days?

Lakes Cadillac and Mitchell

If you have the time to drive head up to Lakes Cadillac and Mitchell in Michgan. These lakes are in great shape for ice fishing and have around 6 to 8 inches of ice.

Look for crappie in the 6 foot to 10 foot range of water. The bite the past few days has been light so make sure you are using lighter and more sensitive gear. Use tear drop jigs in bright colors, tipped with spikes. A fish finder such as a Vexilar helps. Drill and fish lots of holes to help increase your chances of success.

If your looking for bass or northern pike, as usual, find the weeds. Small Cove has been producing the best action. Set your tip-ups in 6 to 10 feet of water around weeds and tip your hooks with suckers. If your going to jig, you’ll want to use crappie minnows. These minnows are a little larger and help create more movement in the water to attract these fish.

Speaking of attracting fishing, also trying using Rippin Raps in natural colors with medium action rods and 8 lbs test. The water is stained and these lures have the action and vibration you’ll need to attract the fish from further away.

If you need bait make sure to swing by Pilgram’s Village Bait Shop. They have all you need to make your time on the water more successful.

Possible Polar Vortex?

It seems we have been hearing this for awhile but there are some weather models that are saying and continue to say we could be due for some arctic air toward the end of January, with February being below normal temps. Let’s hope so.

On January 19th we’re going to be at the Cabela’s Outfitters Expo in Grand Rapids from 12 to 4. If you have the time, swing by and see us. Until then we’ll leave you this. “If you fish all day, you’ll never miss the bite window.”


Steelhead Fishing Report for the Grand River 12/18

This is the Grand River fishing report as of December 2018.  Colder than normal temperatures were the story for the first half of December.  As a result this has put the steelhead into their winter mode on the Grand River.  The steelhead numbers are somewhat down from previous years but the fish seem bigger.  

The water temperature has been cold, mid 30’s and somewhat stained.  Slow things down to get the best response to your presentation.  Remember, look for the slow water and the deeper runs and holes.  You’ll need to float your drift numerous times through, as the fish are sluggish right now.  

Set Up:

Currently, the only method we’ve been using right now is float.  Our main line has been 12 lbs mono dropping to an 8 lbs leader and in some instances 6 lbs.  The reel has been a Daiwa 4000 series with a 10’ 6” Okuma SST rod.  

Try using beads in various orange colors along with chartreuse and mix it up between the 12 mills and the 10 mills.  Remember, if your using 12 mills you should use a #4 hook.  Use a Raven 11 gram bobber.  If the steelhead feel any resistance when they grab, they’ll let it go.  

However, if the runs are short try the chuck and duck method.  This will get your rig down quicker to where the fish are than a float rig normally would. 

If you’re going to use flies, use larger egg patters with some color along with larger stoneflies.   

Weather Shift:

A warmer than normal weather pattern is setting up for the rest of the month, along with some rain this week.  As a results, the water temp will warm up a bit and this should send some fresh fish up.  With that said, keep using the same techniques.  

Don’t be afraid of the cold, this is a great time of year to fish.  Low pressure and if you put in your time you’ll be rewarded with big fish.  

Werkman Outfitters Offers Guided Ice Fishing Trips

Just because winter sets in doesn’t mean you have to stop fishing.  For the months of January – March, as ice conditions allow, we will offer guided ice fishing trips on Hamlin Lake, Muskegon Lake, White Lake and the bayous of the lower Grand River as well as a few other other west Michigan lakes near Grand Rapids.  

Ice fishing is an excellent way to get outside during the winter months.  It’s family friendly and a great way to introduce kids to the sport.  

We provide all the ice fishing gear, hot lunch and heated shanties to make your day on the ice as fun, successful and comfortable as possible.

A typical day will include fishing for panfish, such as bluegill, perch and crappie as well as northern pike.  We will clean and fillet your catch for you so you can bring it home for a fish fry.

Lakes We Ice Fish:

Hamlin Lake is located in Ludington, Michigan and is a great pike and walleye destination spot. It is also know for it’s night time crappie fishing.

Muskegon Lake, located in Muskegon, Michigan  is known for it walleye, yellow perch, blue gill and northern pike.  

White Lake located in Whitehall, Michigan is known for its northern pike, yellow perch and blue gill.

For more information check out the our website link on ice fishing