The Other Fall Fish

Let me start off by saying we do salmon trips. Landing one of these bruisers can be the thrill of a life time. They can be big, powerful and full of chaos and attitude

But with the change of the season also comes a change in the river. The summer filled solitude, quietness and lazy floats can, at times, bring crowded rivers and bumper boats.

With that said, there are still pockets of solitude for the angler who is looking to get away from it all. This time of year the northern pike start to get more aggressive. As the water cools, the pike bite comes alive as they start to put on weight for the coming winter.

Right now, the water temp in the Grand River is in the low 60’s and we are seeing these “advocates of the devil” appear more and more in their traditional waters. Don’t get me wrong, if you want to specifically target these guys you’ll need to hunt for them, cover lots of water. Like salmon, you’ll have good days and not so good days.

Why pike you ask? While the salmon can easily get you into your backing, the pike won’t. But the visualness of a pike take is something you won’t forget. As you strip the streamer you’ll be able to see the pike come out of nowhere and smack, with all the aggression of a salmon, your fly.

It seems our best action comes on stripping streamers. We have been using Schultzy’s Sculpin patterns and have found good success with them. For some reason the way they flow through the water as they’re stripping has an enticing affect on the pike that they cannot resist. Casting is key during this time as you’ll need to get tight to structure. Use a good pair of sunglasses, I like Costa’s, so you can see the underwater logs, root balls, and rocks as a lot of times the pike will hide under and close to those. Mix up your strip, from quick and long too slow and short, even during the same retrieve.

Fall is really on of the best times of the year to get on the river. There’s so much opportunity for the angler to catch multiple species of fish. From salmon and steelhead to northern pike and smallmouth bass. We still have availability this fall, so give us a call and book your trip.

  • Captain Tom Werkman

Low & Clear.

The Grand River is low. The gage in Ada, for a brief period, dipped below 6.75 feet. Even with the recent rains the river didn’t pop all that much and is coming back down quickly. Clarity went from gin clear to slightly stained. With no rain in the near term forecast, it should remain that way for awhile. The river temps remain in the upper 70’s.

The near term forecast calls for below normal temps. Hopefully, that will drop the river temps below 70 degrees. Once that happens, the pike activity should begin to improve as we saw for a brief period a couple of weeks ago when a strong cold front moved through.

Fishing has been good. As the river has dropped the smallmouth start to hold more in the bucket water, near structure and just along the seams. If you find all three of these in one location fish it. Patience and persistence is being rewarded and will bring fish to net.

Salmon are not showing up yet in the middle section. It’s too early and the water is too warm. Steelhead season is just around the corner. The best time to fish for these on the Grand will be starting at the end of October right on through December. For those of you that fish with Max, he will be back from Alaska by November 1 so give us call and get a date booked with him.

I have to say, the last three months have been incredible for us as a business. Thank you! Thank you to all of our clients that have booked and rebooked with us. Yes, I enjoy getting people on fish and seeing the smiles and laughter that comes with a great day on the river. However, more importantly for me, I enjoy the relationships that are being built! Until next month…..

Captain Tom Werkman

Fantastic Fishing!

The Grand River continues to be in great shape and is fishing well. It’s low and water clarity is the best we’ve seen in quite sometime for this river. When we do get rain, the grasses are acting as filer to help keep the clarity in check.

With the recent cold front, water temps are in the low 70’s. The smallmouth continue to be in their summer patter and tight to structure. Lately it seems that the afternoon bite is the strongest, although we are getting fish through out the day.

If you’ve ever wanted to fish an urban river and feel like you’re 1,000 miles from nowhere, now’s the time. So come and Experience Grand Rapids and all the fishing opportunities the Grand River has to offer. Give us call today.

Captain Tom Werkman

The Grand’s In Great Shape

We’ve hit the summer fishing patterns. After a wet spring that postponed some of our fishing trips, as a result of high river flows, the Grand has dropped to around 8 feet in Ada. Clarity is great right now at around 3 feet. Remember, the Grand River is the second largest drainage system in Michigan so there will always be some stain to it.

Smallmouth are now in their summer mode, sitting tight to structure and in the deeper holes. We’ve been finding them in 5 to 8 feet. You’ll need to make a number of passes through the holes and against the structure to entice the larger ones to take your lure.

Dredging continues to produce. We’re using creature baits in black with blue and red flicking. 1/4 oz bullet weights and 4/0 hooks. Line is 20 lbs Power Pro High-Vis Yellow tied right to the hooks. This allows us to get right into the structure without fear of losing the fish after there take.

Pike action has been good, however, with water temps approaching near 80 please don’t play them very long, take a quick picture and return them back to the river quickly. At these temps, the pike are stressed and any prolonged play and extended picture taking will increase mortality.

Double willow bladed spinner baits and Mepps Muskey Killers are our goto’s. Fish the slack water and sloughs. Make several casts, keep your eye on the water and watch for the follow. Many times, pike will follow your lure to the boat. After the follow, if the take doesn’t happen, then cast right back out and be ready.

Summer time is one of the best times to be on the Grand and right now we have almost perfect conditions. If you want to catch smallmouth on Michigan’s largest river give us a call.

Grand River Fishing Report

The weather has been beautiful lately and the fishing has been great too! There has been lots of opportunity for multiple species on the Grand for bass, pike, and even a few walleye mixed in. Here is our Grand River report fo June 2020

For bass, multiple techniques have been productive fish. Anywhere from baitfish to crayfish imitations have brought some nice bass to the boat. Rapala X-Raps, jointed Rapalas, and square bill crank baits have been some of the top producers. Try fishing darker colors during these bright sunny days such as perch, olive, and some dark tans. The best size that we have found are size 10 (or 4 inch baits). Give the lure a slow retrieve with a few jerks while retrieving it back to the boat. Spinner baits have also been productive. Lately chartreuse have been what it working best. Again give it a nice slow steady restive back to the boat.

Lastly we have been getting some fish on creature baits dredging the bottom. How to rig these would be to slide a bullet weight (size of the weight is dependent on how fast the current is and how deep the water is). Rig these creature baits Texas style with the hook inside the bait to keep it from snagging the bottom. Normally we will fish olive, tan, and black baits.

Give us a call and come out and enjoy the beautiful weather with a very unpressurized fishery we have on the Grand River. 

Grand River Fishing Report

With the recent re-opening of guide service in Michigan we would like to take a second and share some of the updates we have made in response to Covid-19.

One of the biggest rules that the DNR has stated is we must comply with social distancing and the 6ft rule. Our boats are 15 and 16 feet long, therefore, we can are only able to run one person guide trips as of now.

One person guide trips are a great way to get lots of one-on-one with the guide and it allows us to completely focus on working with you, the client.

Because we are limited to one person and almost all of our trips are two person, we have lowered our full-day trip to $225. That’s a deal and with it you get 8 hours of fishing. We will can continue to provide all the gear and equipment. However, you will need to bring your own lunch, snacks and drinks. Per the return to work order, we are not allowed to cook lunch.

We can provide person protective equipment (such as masks and gloves) but we encourage you to bring your own and wear it. In addition, we will be cleaning and disinfecting all our gear and boat surfaces at the end of each trip. 

This may seem like a lot but it’s a start for us getting back to work and getting our you back on the water.

Fishing as been some what consistent. Smallmouth fishing has been picking up with the beautiful weather we have been having. As long as we don’t have excessive amounts of rain fishing will continue to improve.  

Give us call and book your time on the water with us.

Tom and Max Werkman

Grand River Report

Spring has finally started to show its face in west Michigan and that means large numbers of steelhead are entering the river systems. Here’s our river report for March 12, 2020.

Water temps are anywhere between 38-42 degrees. These temps mean fish are on the move. Good numbers of chrome and dark fish are being caught which means this is just the first sign of our spring run.

Spawn and large beads have been bringing the most fish to the boat. Sizes and colors are all dependent on water level and clarity. Pink and chartreuse spawn bags with 5-10 eggs in them are the biggest producers. Fireball orange, chartreuse, and glow roe in sizes 8mm-12mm are the best beads from this past week. Number 4 hooks are what I prefer to run with for both bags and beads.

We are still targeting areas with 4-6 feet of water dept as well as transition water in search of moving fish. Transition water is defined as travel corridors or pinch points. These area are where you can intercept migrating fish.

This is the week when our spring run will start so give us a call to get in on the action. 

– Captain Max Werkman

Grand River Fishing Report

This has been a crazy winter with the mild temps. Ice has been non-existent to mostly unsafe and the Grand is finally in good shape. Here is our Grand River fishing report as of February 18, 2020.

Steelhead Fishing:

With temps around freezing we’ve been able to get out on the river and chase some steelhead. Along with the dark fall hold-overs, fresh chrome fish have been showing up in the systems. This means that our spring run of steelhead is just starting and fishing will continue to get better.

Eggs and spawn have been the most productive. Chartreuse and white colored bags are what works best. Usually running around 4-8 eggs in a spawn bag.  Beads such as peachy king, glow roe, and egg yolk are also working. Try using sizes 8 millimeters all the way to 12 millimeters based on water level. Jigs tipped with wax worms have also been bringing some fish in. 

Ice Fishing:

Safe ice has been hit or miss on area lakes. Last week the ice was safe and we could get out. With this weekends warm up, much of that ice will melt. Please pay attention to weather and call local bait shops to make sure there is safe ice. Many people have ventured out only to fall through.

When we could get on safe ice, the bluegill fishing was good. Small jigs tipped with spikes are the number one bait. Slowly jig a foot or two off the bottom in about 6 to 10 feet of water.

Perch fishing has been on fire. A live minnow will always work. Use double perch rigs just off the bottom as well as jigging something with a rattle in it. Your target water depth will be between 20 to 40.

Spring is just around the corner and so are the steelhead. Give us a call to book your trip. March and April are excellent times to get in on the run.

Grand River Fishing Report

With above freezing temperatures for most of December the area rivers have opened up to fishing. Over the past few weeks steelhead fishing has been decent.  Here is the Grand River Fishing Report as of January 1, 2020.


A few fish have been hooked and landed throughout the day. We’ve been catching a mixed bag of dark hold-over steelhead with fresh chrome.

We continue to use beads but have been mixing it up with spawn for the best action.  Try running nickel to quarter size bags with pink and chartreuse netting. As far as beads go, try the more pale and milked out colors to entice the fish. Mottled peachy king and peach fuzz in 8 and 10 millimeters have been working best.

Water temps have been between 32-34 degrees. We’ve been targeting slightly deeper and slower runs where the fish will lay this time of year. Rain, wind, sleet and snow, it’s all in the future forecast,which will hopefully bring in new fish before it gets too cold to river fish. 

On the flip side, colder temps in the future will help with our ice growth. As of now, very few if any of the area lakes have ice. Because of that, we have moved our ice trips into February.  

While the rivers are open, get out and enjoy some steelhead fishing before the the ice takes over, or start thinking of spending the day on the hard water and give us call to book a trip in February.

Winters Coming

Who ever said that steelhead fishing was easy, never went steelhead fishing. Right now the steelhead fishing has been slow. With that said, here’s our fishing report for December 7, 2019.

Steelhead Fishing Report:

The Grand River has been having its ups and downs, literally. Rain continues to make fishing difficult. We have been seeing flow rates at 6th Street drop to fishable levels only to spike back up to unfishable levels…. all within the same week. In addition to the rain, we have snow that comes and then melts, cooling the river down and subsequently the fishing. This same event has held true for the more intimate northern rivers we’ve been fishing as well.

With all the said, we are still managing to bring steelhead to net, albeit, not every trip.

The fish we have been finding are in the slower, deeper, dark holes. You’ll need to float these winter sports several times, adjusting you bobber depth and switching out your beads to find what the fish like.

If you want to catch steelhead, take advantage of these last few days of “warm” temperatures before the rivers freeze over.

Ice Fishing Report:

Although winter is literally knocking at the front door, as of this report, there is no safe ice. Most lakes are open and if there is ice it won’t support anyone walking it.

Right now the Climate Prediction Center is calling for below average temperatures for the Great Lakes and above average precipitation for the months of January, February and March. For the month of December the Climate Prediction Center is calling for near normal.

Winter can be a great time to enjoy fishing. We have all the gear, electronics and heated shanties so you can have a comfortable and successful day on the ice.

We are starting to take reservations for the ice fishing season. If you want to book now, look to do your tip starting in January, as lakes Cadillac and Mitchell tend to be the first to freeze, followed closely by Hamlin Lake in Ludington. These lakes are excellent for northern pike, walleye, crappie and bluegills.

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